Sponsored School Search


How to Become an Electrician in Oklahoma

In Oklahoma, construction businesses are growing at a steady pace. According to the Top 5000 list published by Inc. Magazine, three of the top five fastest growing businesses in Oklahoma are in the construction industry. This has caused the electrical trade to grow steadily in Oklahoma with the state’s Employment Security Commission predicting a 15.9% increase in the number of electrician jobs during the ten-year period leading up to 2024.

SPONSORED

Featured Online Residential Electrician Career Diploma Program

Penn Foster Career School's regionally and nationally accredited Residential Electrician Program is 100% online and will help you prepare for the demands of the job. You'll take courses in electrical theory, schematics, troubleshooting, the National Electrical Code®, and much more, all at your own pace. Get the training to help you take the first step towards your career as a Residential Electrician.

To start a career as an electrician in Oklahoma, you should become familiar with the Oklahoma Construction Industries Board, which is responsible for apprentice registration and the issuance of journeyman electrician licenses and electrical contractor licenses.

Follow these steps to learn how to become a licensed electrician in Oklahoma:

Gain the Hands-on Experience Required to Become an Unlimited or Residential Journeyman
Take the Examination Required to Become a Journeyman
Consider Becoming Licensed as an Independent Electrical Contractor

 


 

Step 1. Gain the Hands-on Experience Required to Become an Unlimited or Residential Journeyman

Journeyman licensure in Oklahoma requires four years (8,000 hours) of hands on training and job experience.

Becoming a licensed electrician is a years long process that starts by working in a paid position as an apprentice or trainee under a licensed journeyman or contractor. There are two common options available for getting the requisite job experience and classroom based education: enroll in a technical college, or go right into a union or non-union apprenticeship program.

Of the 8,000 hours of on the job experience, 4,000 must be in the commercial space. These are the only requirements. However, the regulations also state that you can substitute up to 2,000 hours of education for 2,000 hours of on the job experience, which equates to a year of experience.

Technical College

Technical colleges are a standard option for starting a career as an electrician. Through an electrical technical program, you can get a certificate of competency, or a two-year associate of applied science degree. Keep in mind, up to 2,000 hours of this education can be substituted for a year of experiential requirements.

Since classroom training is essential to becoming a highly skilled electrician, it is wise to consider an educational program before beginning your apprenticeship or trainee position. You’ll need to become educated on the following topics to ensure that you have a strong knowledge of electrical systems:

  • Industrial Safety
  • Electrical Theory
  • AC/DC Circuits
  • Electrical Construction Calculations
  • National Electric Code
  • Commercial and Residential Wiring
  • Electrical Motor Controls
  • Transformers
  • Motors
  • Blueprints

As for finding work after completing the program so you can begin accumulating the remaining hours required for your journeyman license, you have a few options. You can look for a job on your own using traditional job seeking methods. You can utilize the resources of your technical program, which often involves job placement services. Some programs are designed to actually transition you into the field as an electrical technician trainee or apprentice. Or, you can use the education and employment resources of a non-union organization to help you find an entry-level job. Contractors often post listings with local union and non-union organizations, so don’t pass those up. You may find work at such top rated and large contractors in Oklahoma as:

  • Buxton Electric LLC in Tulsa
  • Delta Electrical Contractors Inc in Oklahoma City
  • Ward, Ramsey Electric Company in Ardmore

Union Apprenticeships

Union apprenticeships are available through local JATCs, or Joint Apprenticeship & Training Committees. These programs are made available through the National Training Alliance, a partnership between local chapters of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) and the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA).

This is a more traditional path to a career as an electrician because it includes both education and employment support in one package. There are two JATCs in Oklahoma:

Union membership is required to participate.

Non-Union Apprenticeships

In contrast, non-union apprenticeships are great options for people looking to continue previously completed education or otherwise not interested in joining the union. Trade associations made up of non-union contractors and electricians develop non-union programs for aspiring electricins.

Here are the non-union programs in Oklahoma:

Apprentice Registration

Once you enroll in an apprenticeship program, you need to register as an apprentice through the Construction Industries Board. Fill out this application to complete your registration. You need to renew your registration every year that you are an apprentice until you finish your apprenticeship.

 


 

Step 2. Take the Examination Required to Become a Journeyman

After completing your apprenticeship, you can take an exam to work as an unlimited journeyman electrician. An unlimited journeyman electrician is a professional electrician that isn’t an electrical contractor. To get this license, you need to meet the following requirements:

  • 8,000 hours as an electrical apprentice
  • 4,000 hours in commercial/industrial work
  • Passing the journeyman electrician exam

Start by filling out this application as an Unlimited Journeyman. Once you send in the application and receive approval to take the journeyman exam, you can schedule the exam.

Information about the exam can be found at this page. The exam is 4 hours and 15 minutes long, open book, and is 100 questions long. To pass, you need to get a score of 75% on the exam. On the exam, you can reference the 2014 National Electric Code and any edition of Ugly’s Electrical Reference. The questions on the exam break down into the following topics:

  • General Knowledge – 4 questions
  • General Electrical Knowledge – 10 questions
  • Electrical Installation Requirements – 10 questions
  • Services, Feeders, and Branch Circuits – 10 questions
  • Overcurrent Protection – 6 questions
  • Grounding and Bonding – 10 questions
  • Conductors and Cables – 6 questions
  • Raceways and Boxes – 7 questions
  • Special Occupancies and Equipment – 10 questions
  • Low Voltage, Alarms, Signaling Systems, and Communications – 7 questions
  • Lighting and Signs – 10 questions
  • Safety – 4 questions
  • Motors and Transformers – 6 questions

Once you pass the exam, you will receive your unlimited journeyman license. You will need to renew your license every year using this form. You also need to keep your education up to date every three years. You are required to complete six hours of continuing education every three years to keep your license current. You can find a list of courses on the Construction Industries Board site.

 


 

Step 3. Consider Becoming Licensed as an Independent Electrical Contractor

After working as an unlimited journeyman electrician for two years or 4,000 hours, you have the option of working as an unlimited electrical contractor. Electrical contractors can sell their services to the public and hire journeyman electricians.

To earn an unlimited electrical contractor license, you need to meet the following requirements:

  • 12,000 hours of experience as an electrician
  • 4,000 hours of experience as an unlimited journeyman electrician
  • 6,000 hours of experience in commercial/industrial work
  • Pass the electrical contractor exam
  • Pass the Business & law exam

Start by filling out this application as an Unlimited Electrical Contractor. Once you send in the application and receive approval to take the exams, you can schedule the exams.

Information about the Business & Law exam and the Unlimited Electrical Contractor exam can be found at this page.

The Business & Law exam is two hours long, has 50 questions, and is open book. To pass, you need to score a 75% on the exam. The questions on the exam break down into the following topics:

  • Bidding and Estimating – 10 questions
  • Project Management and Supervision – 7 questions
  • Contracts – 5 questions
  • Financial – 8 questions
  • Labor and Personnel – 5 questions
  • Risk Management – 4 questions
  • Payroll and Payroll Taxes – 5 questions
  • Licensing Requirements – 6 questions

The Unlimited Electrical Contractor Exam is four hours long, has 100 questions, and is open book. You can use the 2014 National Electric Code and any edition of Ugly’s Electrical Reference. To mass, you need to score a 75% on the exam. The questions on the exam break down into the following topics:

  • General Knowledge – 4 questions
  • General Electrical Knowledge – 10 questions
  • Electrical Installation Requirements – 10 questions
  • Services, Feeders, and Branch Circuits – 10 questions
  • Overcurrent Protection – 6 questions
  • Grounding and Bonding – 10 questions
  • Conductors and Cables – 6 questions
  • Raceways and Boxes – 7 questions
  • Special Occupancies and Equipment – 10 questions
  • Low Voltage, Alarms, Signaling Systems, and Communications – 7 questions
  • Lighting and Signs – 10 questions
  • Safety – 4 questions
  • Motors and Transformers – 6 questions

You also need to meet the following insurance and bond requirements:

  • A $5,000 bond issued to the Bonds and Insurance Unit
  • General liability insurance of $50,000

Once you pass the exam, you will receive your unlimited electrical contractor license. You will need to renew your license every year with this form. You also need to keep your education up to date every three years. You are required to complete six hours of continuing education every three years to keep your license current. To can find a list of courses on the Construction Industries Board site.

Back to Top